Weather Alert

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE ISSUED “WEATHER BRIEFING UPDATE #5” 06182024.0095

Dangerous Heat is expected through the rest of the week and into the weekend. Daily temperatures will be near or above 90°F, and heat index readings will be near or even top 100°F each afternoon. 

Important Change: Extended the Heat Advisory through 8 PM Friday

For more information, see attached briefing or view it online at https://www.weather.gov/media/ctp/Briefing/briefing.pdf.

Wm. Dennis Buttorff
Emergency Manager
West Branch Emergency Management Association, Inc.

Notice: Bank Stabilization Project

The SR (State Route) 44-86S (PennDOT) project is a two-year embankment stabilization project between Torbert Lane and Tombs Run in Watson Township. Work on this project began in the Spring of 2024 and includes stabilizing the existing embankment using soil nailing, wire mesh, and rock armoring, throughout the project limits, which are shown in RED on the below location map. Motorists can expect single lane conditions controlled by a temporary traffic signal. Work on this project is anticipated to be completed by the fall of 2025. If you have specific questions about this project, contact Jay Miller at 570-368-4233 or by email at [email protected]. The SR 44-103 (EQT Partnership) project is a two-year embankment stabilization project located between SR 973 in Watson Township and Waterville in Cummings Township. Work on this project is anticipated to begin in July of 2024 and includes stabilizing 18 embankment areas throughout the project limits, which are shown in RED on the below location map. Motorists can expect delays in travel due to a combination of temporary traffic signals and flagging where work is being performed. EQT is the administrator of this $9.3 million embankment stabilization project, which is anticipated to be complete by the summer of 2025. If you have specific questions about this project, contact Steve Tokarz at 570-368-4226 or by email at [email protected]. Both projects have an 11-foot width restriction and will have a winter shut down.

Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Collection Event

Starting this year, the Clinton County Solid Waste Authority will be sponsoring a Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Collection Event on an annual basis.

This free event will typically be held on a Saturday during the summer months and will enable residents to properly dispose of hazardous chemicals that could otherwise contaminate our environment.

The 2024 Houschold Hazardous Waste (HHW) Collection Event will be held on July 20th, at our Recycling Center in Wayne Township.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact Thresa Lingenfelter at 570-769-6977.

Download the file here

Click for Fire Risk Info:

NOTICE: The currently posted fire risk level is ONLY updated when the level changes.

Fire Danger is expressed using these levels

LOW – Fuels do not ignite readily from small firebrands although a more intense heat source, such as lightning, may start fires in duff or light fuels.

MODERATE – Fires can start from most accidental causes, but with the exception of lightning fires in some areas, the number of starts is generally low.

HIGH – All fine dead fuels ignite readily and fires start easily from most causes.

VERY HIGH – Fires start easily from all causes and, immediately after ignition, spread rapidly and increase quickly in intensity.

EXTREME – Fires start quickly, spread furiously, and burn intensely. All fires are potentially serious.

DCNR Wildfire Information:

Wildfires in Pennsylvania

The greatest danger of wildfires in Pennsylvania occurs during the spring months of March, April, and May, and the autumn months of October and November. In Pennsylvania, 99 percent of all wildfires are caused by people.

Certain conditions are necessary for a wildfire to occur:

  • An available fuel source, such as dried grass or leaves
  • Dry conditions, including low relative humidity
  • An ignition source — some way for the fire to start

The first two factors occur most frequently in Pennsylvania during spring and autumn. As the spring sun climbs higher in the sky, days become longer and warmer.

The trees are bare during this time, allowing sunlight to reach the forest floor, warming the ground, and drying surface fuels.

Coupled with strong and dry spring winds, this leads to a tremendous amount of combustible fuels.

During autumn, leaves turn color and begin to fall, accumulating in a deep, fluffy layer that creates a fire hazard.

The third factor, an ignition source, also frequently occurs during these periods.

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